News

Will this aircraft use ammonia fuel?

Imaginary sketch of an airplane using ammonia as fuel. (Photo: Reaction engines)

London: The three British companies are working together to develop an engine that will use ammonia gas as fuel.

It should be noted that airplanes use a fuel called ‘jet fuel’ which is usually made by mixing 30% kerosene (kerosene) and 70% gasoline (petrol).

Due to the ever-increasing air travel in the world, this jet fuel is also causing pollution, and efforts to replace it with a new and environmentally friendly fuel have been going on for many years.

A joint venture between three British companies, Reaction Engines, STFC and IP Group, is part of a series that will use state-of-the-art technology (SABRE) for jet engines. This technology is developed by reaction engines.

According to reports, ammonia can produce 50% more energy than jet fuel, but it emits 70% more energy than the other proposed alternative fuel, hydrogen.

Not only that, but ammonia is also very easy to store and transport, while it can be stored in a much smaller space than liquid hydrogen.

This means that if ammonia were used as an alternative fuel, there would be no need to dramatically increase the size of aircraft engines and fuel tanks.

In contrast, hydrogen fuel would require such a large fuel tank and engine that there would be very little passenger space on board.

Despite all the other benefits of ammonia fuel, environmentalists say that it may be more environmentally friendly than jet fuel because burning jet fuel in the atmosphere releases not only carbon dioxide and water vapor but also nitrogen oxides when burning ammonia. NOx) Gases will be released which can poison the atmosphere and cause an increase in acid rain.

At the moment it is too early to say anything because the technology of ammonia fuel engines is still in its infancy.

Only after thousands of experiments and hundreds of tests will a final decision be made on whether it will be usable in aircraft or not.

Related Articles

Back to top button